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Coronavirus weekly need-to-know: Eviction ban, male fertility, life expectancy & more

Nurse Jody Berry draws a syringe full of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic at Mother’s Brewing Company in Springfield, Mo., on Tuesday, June 22, 2021. As the U.S. emerges from the COVID-19 crisis, Missouri is becoming a cautionary tale for the rest of the country: It is seeing an alarming rise in cases because of a combination of the fast-spreading delta variant and stubborn resistance among many people to getting vaccinated.

Nurse Jody Berry draws a syringe full of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic at Mother’s Brewing Company in Springfield, Mo., on Tuesday, June 22, 2021. As the U.S. emerges from the COVID-19 crisis, Missouri is becoming a cautionary tale for the rest of the country: It is seeing an alarming rise in cases because of a combination of the fast-spreading delta variant and stubborn resistance among many people to getting vaccinated.

AP

Each week, we offer you a round-up of our noteworthy coronavirus coverage.

More than 33.5 million people in the United States have tested positive for the coronavirus as of Friday morning, June 25, according to Johns Hopkins University. That includes more than 603,000 people who have died nationwide.

Globally, there have been more than 180 million confirmed cases of the highly infectious virus, with more than 3.9 million reported deaths.

More than 151.2 million Americans are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 as of June 24 — about 46% of the total population, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tracker shows. About 56% of adults and 53% of people aged 12 and older are fully vaccinated in the U.S.

Here’s what happened between June 18 and June 24.

White House extends COVID-19 vaccine target past July 4

The White House COVID-19 team said the nation is “close to achieving” but likely won’t make President Joe Biden’s goal set in early May for 70% of all adults to have at least one coronavirus shot, with 160 million fully vaccinated by July 4th.

And young adults are partly to blame.

The U.S. has met Biden’s goal of having 70% of adults get at least one shot before Independence Day only for those aged 30 and older, but it will take a “few extra weeks” beyond July 4 to get 18- to 26-year-olds to the 70% threshold.

CDC extends pandemic eviction ban in the U.S. for last time

Federal health officials extended the national moratorium on evictions that was set to expire on June 30. Now, tenants who are unable to make rental payments are protected from eviction until July 31.

The extension, signed by CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky, is “intended to be the final” one of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a statement.

Here’s everything to know about the extension.

Pfizer and Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines do not affect male fertility

Pfizer and Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccines do not affect male fertility and should not impact men’s ability to have a family in the future, according to a new University of Miami Miller School of Medicine study.

The original clinical trials by Pfizer and Moderna did not evaluate the vaccines for reproductive toxicity. Instead, those trials focused on whether the vaccines would be effective against COVID-19. Previous research found that the COVID-19 virus can affect male fertility and possibly cause erectile dysfunction.

What to know.

US life expectancy drops most since WWII— COVID-19 not the only reason

Life expectancy at birth in the U.S. has decreased by 1.87 years or 2.4% from 2018 to 2020 — the largest drop the nation has seen since World War II, according to a new multi-institution study. The decrease for those aged 25 and 65 were even greater at 3.4% and 5.7%, respectively.

And building on evidence collected throughout the pandemic, communities of color were affected the most.

Among white people, life expectancy declined by 1.36 years in 2020. But it dropped by 3.88 years in Hispanic people and 3.25 years in Black people, nearly erasing improvements made over the years in race-related mortality gaps.

Continue reading to learn how life expectancy in the U.S. compares to other high income countries.

More than 50 infected with COVID-19 in outbreak from Illinois summer camp

A COVID-19 outbreak at an Illinois summer camp has infected dozens of people. The outbreak stemming from The Crossing Camp in Rushville has led to over 50 people being infected with the virus, the Pike County Health Department said.

On Tuesday, the health department in nearby Schuyler County said the coronavirus exposure happened during a camp from June 13 to 17. The church camp was designated for students from 8th to 12th grade.

Poll: Are Americans worried about COVID-19 spreading to family?

An all-time low percentage of people said they’re very concerned about COVID spreading to them or their family, according to a recent poll.

The survey, done by the Associated Press and the National Opinion Research Center for Public Affairs Research, found 21% of respondents said they’re “very worried” or “extremely worried” about the virus reaching them or their family — a record low since the pandemic began. A quarter of respondents said they’re “very concerned” or “extremely worried” that lifted coronavirus restrictions will lead to more infections.

Fewer people say religion is gaining influence after pandemic

After doubling in May 2020, the share of people saying religion is gaining influence in the U.S. has fallen to pre-pandemic levels in the latest poll.

A Gallup poll found that 16% of Americans said religion is growing more influential compared with 27% who said the same in December 2020 and 38% who said it in April 2020. Meanwhile, 82% of respondents said religion is losing influence compared with 58% who said that in April 2020.

Here’s what else the poll found.

Woman used inmates’ names to help steal $700K in COVID-19 unemployment

Farren Ricketts started a company charging clients thousands of dollars to file falsified applications for unemployment benefits during the coronavirus pandemic.

She even hired a small staff when business picked up, the government said.

Now the 30-year-old from Virginia faces prison time. Ricketts waived her right to an indictment and pleaded guilty on Monday to charges of conspiracy, mail fraud and identity theft, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Virginia.

Follow more of our reporting on Full coverage of coronavirus in Washington


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Katie Camero is a McClatchy National Real-Time Science reporter based in Miami. She’s an alumna of Boston University and has reported for the Wall Street Journal, Science, and The Boston Globe.



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