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Dodger Stadium Protesters Highlight Ballpark’s Controversial Origins

There were echoes of the controversial origins of Dodger Stadium during a game on September 15, as protesters took to the field carrying signs with the names of Mexican-American communities that were cleared to make way for the ballpark in the 1950s. Various social media posts showed the protesters carried signs saying Bishop, La Loma, and Palo Verde – three communities that once made up the Chavez Ravine area, where Dodger Stadium now stands. A sign reading “Not Chavez Ravine” was also seen hanging from a stand. Two of the three on-field protesters can be seen in this video being tackled by security. Other footage showed one of the protesters being escorted out of the stadium. The Dodgers defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks on the night, 5-3. Credit: @bbygirlsolita via Storyful

There were echoes of the controversial origins of Dodger Stadium during a game on September 15, as protesters took to the field carrying signs with the names of Mexican-American communities that were cleared to make way for the ballpark in the 1950s. Various social media posts showed the protesters carried signs saying Bishop, La Loma, and Palo Verde – three communities that once made up the Chavez Ravine area, where Dodger Stadium now stands. A sign reading “Not Chavez Ravine” was also seen hanging from a stand. Two of the three on-field protesters can be seen in this video being tackled by security. Other footage showed one of the protesters being escorted out of the stadium. The Dodgers defeated the Arizona Diamondbacks on the night, 5-3. Credit: @bbygirlsolita via Storyful

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