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National Archives plea for emergency funding to preserve historical records

Sky News host Peta Credlin has spoken to Monash University Emeritus Professor Graeme Davison about the National Archives' pleas to the Morrison Government for emergency funding to preserve thousands of written documents and records.

The wartime speeches of John Curtin, the births, deaths, and marriages register from Pitcairn Island, and the personnel files of World War II RAAF pilots are amongst records at risk.

"Paper records are also in danger, but especially we're concerned about the film and audio recordings, which of course in their nature decay very rapidly over time," Mr Davison said.

"We're a little dismayed the government overlooked this request which was made as a result of an inquiry made by senior public servants about 18 months ago."

Sky News host Peta Credlin has spoken to Monash University Emeritus Professor Graeme Davison about the National Archives’ pleas to the Morrison Government for emergency funding to preserve thousands of written documents and records.

The wartime speeches of John Curtin, the births, deaths, and marriages register from Pitcairn Island, and the personnel files of World War II RAAF pilots are amongst records at risk.

“Paper records are also in danger, but especially we’re concerned about the film and audio recordings, which of course in their nature decay very rapidly over time,” Mr Davison said.

“We’re a little dismayed the government overlooked this request which was made as a result of an inquiry made by senior public servants about 18 months ago.”

Sky News host Peta Credlin has spoken to Monash University Emeritus Professor Graeme Davison about the National Archives’ pleas to the Morrison Government for emergency funding to preserve thousands of written documents and records.

The wartime speeches of John Curtin, the births, deaths, and marriages register from Pitcairn Island, and the personnel files of World War II RAAF pilots are amongst records at risk.

“Paper records are also in danger, but especially we’re concerned about the film and audio recordings, which of course in their nature decay very rapidly over time,” Mr Davison said.

“We’re a little dismayed the government overlooked this request which was made as a result of an inquiry made by senior public servants about 18 months ago.”

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